PERSPECTIVES


A Good Deputy Helps You Sleep at Night

January 16, 2015 - A good COO or even a gopher helps you sleep at night

In a recent Financial Times article, “Seven lessons in management I learnt over the last decade,” Michael Skapinker delivers succinct lessons in one of the best management pieces we’ve read. Of particular help for our CEO clients and placements, he points out: “A good deputy helps you sleep at night.”  By “deputy” Skapinker is broadly referring to anyone who can leverage you, whether that’s a formal COO title or a bright, hungry young intern who is sophisticated enough to appreciate being a good “gopher” to the CEO.

Too often CEOs worry that a “No 2” needs to be a formal COO title with the compensation requirements that goes with that person (and fear it might upset the senior management apple cart). However, think of this person as anyone age 18 to 80 who is bright, capable and can leverage you.  Ideally, the “No 2” or “deputy” should possess skills different from yours, while at the same time, support you.

No matter the title, as CEO, you need someone who will take your vision and turn it into operational reality.

Read the full article >

Companies: The Whole Point Is To Achieve Collectively What You Cannot Do By Yourself.

January 9, 2015 - Complexities can hinder a companys success

In a recent editorial from The Economist (“Decluttering the Economy”), there is a line that is a brilliant and simple reminder of why we come together under one roof to work: “The point of companies is to get people to achieve collectively what they cannot do individually.”  It tends to be the individual “super star” that gets the press’s attention, but a super star is only a super star if he/she raises the level of play for the entire team.


Have A Vision, Be The Best

January 7, 2015 - Hermes CEO Have a vision, be the best

Here are some “pearls” from a recent Financial Times interview with former Chief Executive of Hermès, Patrick Thomas (“Forget the label – see the person”):

  • First, work for a place where you learn the “longer term view.” It’s difficult to do this when you’re on the quarter-to-quarter grind.
  • Second, “you have to have a vision. If you don’t know where you going, you won’t get there…It’s all very well to copy the others, but you will only ever do as well as the best in your class; if you have your own vision you can be the best.”
  • Third, “Nothing gives better return on investment than investment in your people – not only financially. Yes, train them so they feel competent, but sharing the vision is more important for their happiness. In every company I managed I made sure everyone from the factory workers to the managers understood how they were contributing to the company’s vision and direction. That helps them feel fulfilled.”

Simple advice, yet timeless.

Read the full article >

Trust, More Than Anything Else Impacts Your Success As A Leader.

January 15, 2015 - Trust, more than anything else impacts your success as a leader

In a recent article, Fortune asked the question: “What advice would you give someone going into a leadership position for the first time?” to China Gorman, CEO of Great Place to Work Institute” in “The one quality all leaders must have.” Her advice? “Start by scheduling a couple of hours with each [direct report], just to talk.” These “just to talk” meetings aren’t intended to waste valuable work time or swipe the company card for a free lunch. They’re intended to build trust between the leader and individuals. Gorman points out that “trust, more than anything else impacts your success as a leader. The more trust you cultivate, the better you lead, the more you achieve, and the higher you climb.”


A Boom Brewing in Japan

January 5, 2015 - A boom brewing in Japan

For the contrarian thinker, here’s a thought-provoking article on Japan: “Prepare for the coming Japanese boom.” In this Financial Times piece, Peter Tasker points to evidence that suggests that Japan is on the brink of an economic boom (after countless experts have made similar predictions and been proven wrong). He credits the depreciating yen as the “key driver” of a rise in tourism to Japan. “In recent years corporate Japan has held down investment in new facilities while boosting profit margins” he says, strengthening the country’s solvency and marking it as the world’s largest creditor. “For a country not in crisis to experience a currency decline on such a scale is rare.”  Will Japan’s economy surprise us this time after all?

Read the full article >

TOP